Selling My Books: Malcolm Welshman’s Top Tip for Book Promotion

Every Writers’ Wednesday, a successful author shares a favourite book promotion tip here on Debbie Young’s Off The Shelf blog

This post’s going up a day early to fit in with the guest’s busy blog tour schedule!

Pets Aplenty blog tour  banner

Malcolm Welshman with Dora the dog

Malcolm Welshman with his PR assistant Dora

I’d first spotted Malcolm Welshman on Facebook and was amused by his comments and attracted by the look of his novels some time ago. Then recently I was introduced to him by our mutual friend, the author and publisher Helen Hart of SilverWood Books. Being a big fan of James Herriott, I’m very glad to welcome his 21st century’s equivalent to Off The Shelf today, to swiftly put paid to the advice that one should never work with children or animals….

Debbie Young: What’s your favourite book promotion tip? It doesn’t need to be the one that sells the most books – it could just be the one you most enjoy.

Malcolm Welshman: Us Brits aren’t too good at the concept of ‘selling ourselves’ but when it comes down to it, this is what we have to do in order to promote our books. We’ve nurtured them for many months, if not years, crafted them to the finished product. Once published, we can’t afford to sit back and let things happen since they won’t. If you pull the plug on your endeavours now, you’ll just watch your efforts drain away. And that simply won’t wash. Having had three novels published since 2011, it’s taken me that length of time to play the publicity field and see what’s the best way to ensure my books score. Uncomfortable with the notion of selling myself, I’ve found a way of doing it through my dog – Dora, a Yorkie-cross rescue.

Debbie Young: How do you do it? Please give brief instructions!

Malcolm Welshman: Three years back, I offered to do a diary in Dora’s name as part of a pets’ page on a national website. This has now become a regular monthly feature on www.sixtyplusurfers.co.uk/links.htm. Through Dora’s Diary there’s a link to my website and books on Amazon. This has expanded to Twitter and Facebook where she and I have built up a pack of doggy friends.

Debbie Young: Why do you particularly enjoy this activity?

Cover of Pets Aplenty by Malcolm Welshman

Malcolm Welshman’s latest novel, based on his own career as a vet

Malcolm Welshman: It has allowed me to make contact with like-minded people who own pets and those who also write about them.

Debbie Young: Which book(s) have you used it for and when?

Malcolm Welshman: I started using the Dora link with my second novel, Pets on Parade, and continued using it for Pets Aplenty published at the end of last August.  I have expanded on the idea by having a cartoon professionally drawn of Dora reading Pets Aplenty. Targeting potential new Facebook friends via their interest in dogs, I get Dora to send them a high five paw, add the cartoon and a link to the book.

Debbie Young: If you were doing it again for another book tomorrow, would you do it any differently?

Malcolm Welshman: Providing the theme of the book was still pet-orientated then the successful pawmotion achieved through using Dora means that she’d definitely be collared as my publicist again.

Debbie Young: Which part of the book promotion process do you like least?

Dora with the book in her paw

Could you resist buying a copy when Dora turns her beautiful eyes on you?

Malcolm Welshman: It’s  constantly having to chip away to keep the ‘brand’ noticed and the time taken to do so.

With my first pet novel, Pets in a Pickle, I had no idea of the potential of social networking. I relied on traditional ways such as talks to local groups, radio chats, and a few book signings. The word-of-mouth approach.

The turning point came in the summer of 2011 when I read a feature on how a successful crime writer managed to get five of his ebooks books into the Amazon bestsellers’ top ten list all at the same time. The basic concept was a reduction in the price.

So I persuaded my publisher to reduce my Kindle version to 99p and saw it race up to the number two slot on Kindle’s bestsellers’  list within three weeks. It was then I realised the enormous potential of the Internet and the power of social networking and have used that as the mainstay of my promotional activities ever since.

Debbie Young: Can you name one promotional activity that you’d like to try that you haven’t tried yet – or tried but not yet perfected?

Malcolm Welshman in a rabbit suit

Spot the vet, concealed somewhere in this picture…

Malcolm Welshman: Well if you care to look on my website, there’s a promotional video of Pets in a Pickle showing me running through the bushes wearing a rabbit outfit; and ends with me toasting the new book in the same gear.

I reasoned that my light-hearted, humorous style was well ‘suited’ to donning such an outfit. Indeed, I wore the rabbit suit to help raise funds for the Red Cross; and that gave me the idea for the opening chapter of Pets Aplenty where the young vet, dressed like a rabbit, is dragged across the local shopping precinct by a dog with his teeth in the rabbit’s scut.

It’s becoming a well ‘worn’ theme, so perhaps next time I should try wearing a doggy onesie.

Debbie Young: Is there anything else you’d like to share with readers now? e.g. news of your next book or event.

Malcolm Welshman: Being a retired vet, I appreciate that animals have given me a wonderful fulfilling life. Now writing about my experiences with them albeit it through my alter-ego, Paul Mitchell, it gives me the opportunity to repay them in a small way. I do this by donating signed copies of my books to Rescue Societies for their raffles and tombolas. I also do book signings with proceeds going to the Charity involved. Of course this also helps to promote my books. But as I find writing these tremendous fun I hope that spreading the word in this way also brings fun to more readers.

Debbie Young: Malcolm, thank you so much for sharing your favourite book promotion tips here. I bet other authors reading this will wish they had some furry friends who might help them too!

MORE ABOUT MALCOLM WELSHMAN AND HIS BOOKS

Cartoon of Dora on a sunlounger reading a book

Further reading as recommended by Dora

For more information about Malcolm Welshman, visit his author website here: www.malcolmwelshman.co.uk

You can order his books here via Amazon – or order them at your local bookshop:

Pets in a Pickle  ~  Pets Aplenty  ~  Pets on Parade 

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Read Sell Your Books! by Debbie Young
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Selling My Books: Fenella Miller’s Top Tips for Book Promotion

Every Writers’ Wednesday, a successful self-published author shares a favourite book promotion tip here on Debbie Young’s Off The Shelf blog

Headshot of Fenella Miller

The novelist Fenella Miller

I first met romantic novelist Fenella Miller through the Alliance of Independent Authors, of which we are both author members.

Fenella is a great role model as a hard-working writer who is what’s known as a hybrid author: published by trade press companies but also self-published, gaining the best of both worlds.

I’m particularly pleased that she has so many of her Regency romances published in large print via Ulverscroft – I know from an elderly friend’s experience what a godsend these books are for the housebound and visually impaired.

Fenella’s back catalogue is very impressive, and any reader enjoying one of her books for the first time must be delighted to discover just how many more are available.Not surprisingly for an author with so many books to her name, Fenella earns a good living from writing full time and is walking proof of the maxim I’m so fond of quoting: “The best way to sell more books is to write more books.”

I’m delighted she’s also been able to spare the time to share her top tips for book marketing with us at Off The Shelf today. 

Over to Fenella…

“If I wish to do a free book promotion then I use ‘fiverr’ to put my details on twenty promotional sites. It costs around $15 and is well worth the money as it would take me a morning to do that myself.

“I found it very efficient, and the more sites the book title appears on, the better the download. However, at the moment I am not using the free book promotion, but no doubt I shall return to that at some stage.

Cover of The Duke & the Vicar's Daughter

Fenella Miller’s latest Regency novel

“I now use the Amazon promotional tool which is easy to set up and all instructions are on the site. This has given me excellent sales and I prefer not to be giving away my books for free. Obviously your book must be more than $3/£3 in order to use this tool. I put all my books up to this price so I could reduce them in the promotion – they have to be at the higher price for a month before you can promote them.

“I use Facebook and Twitter to promote my books and much prefer this method as you are talking directly to your readers. I also use my blog to promote and take up any offer to appear on other writers’ blogs as well. I am on over a dozen writing-related groups on Facebook and always mention my latest book on those as well.

“I think that having a newsletter is the best way to improve your readership and promote your new titles, but so far I haven’t ventured down that road. This is something I might well do in the future as it seems to be very successful for other writers.

Fenella Miller’s Latest Books

“My latest Regency title was published at the end of July, entitled The Duke and the Vicar’s Daughter – this is a new title and not from my backlist. The third and final part of my World War II trilogy, Barbara’s War, was published at the end of September. Currently I am writing a ghost story set in Pemberley.”

For more information about Fenella Miller, visit her author website here: www.fenellajmiller.co.uk or follow her on Twitter here: @fenellawriter

FOR MORE TOP TIPS FOR SELF-PUBLISHED & INDIE AUTHORS:

Selling My Books: Atulya Bingham’s Top Tip for Book Promotion

Every Writers’ Wednesday, a successful self-published author shares a favourite book promotion tip here on Debbie Young’s Off The Shelf blog

I first met Atulya Bingham through the Alliance of Independent Authors, of which we’re both author members, and was impressed when she won a prestigious award for her debut novel earlier this year, so it’s a pleasure to welcome her to Off The Shelf today to share her favourite way of marketing her books.

Photo of Atulya Bingham with her book

Atulya Bingham at the launch of her debut novel

Debbie Young: What’s your favourite book promotion tip? It doesn’t need to be the one that sells the most books – it could just be the one you most enjoy.

Atulya Bingham: I thought I’d hate book promotion, yet to my secret horror, I love it. A significant part of the book promotion process concerns finding your niche, the quirkier the better, and working out how to market to it. I discovered (and continue to discover) niches for my novel Ayşe’s Trail long after it was released, and this has proved to be my favourite part of the process.

Debbie Young: How do you do it? Please give brief instructions!

Atulya Bingham: We have been trained by the current publishing industry to think in terms of a few, very limited genre styles, when in fact, many readers are crying out for something less mainstream (I know I was). Initially, I was scratching my head wondering who I’d sell my book too. Ayşe’s Trail is contemporary biography meets historical fiction, and doesn’t fit into the classic genre structure we are used to. The novel is set in Turkey. It concerns a Turkish woman who takes on the historical Lycian Way hiking trail and unwittingly crosses paths with the ancient world. I fretted about what exactly my niche was, until finally I realised one niche wasn’t enough! I deconstructed the genre into a set of apparently quite disparate market sectors: Hikers and adventurers, single women, visitors to Turkey, history buffs and expats. Every time I spot a blog or online platform for one of these niches, I bookmark it in the appropriate folder. Then, I mail them to see if they’d like to review the book, or me to guest post.

Debbie Young: Why do you particularly enjoy this activity?

Atulya Bingham: It’s like an intricate puzzle with my novel at the centre. It’s surprising just how many interest groups, small and large, you can find who might want to read your book. I originally assumed my novel would be bought by hikers, but as time goes by, I see it has a far wider appeal than I envisaged, especially among visitors to Turkey and history lovers.

Debbie Young: Which book(s) have you used it for and when?

Atulya Bingham: For my debut novel, Ayşe’s Trail.

Debbie Young: If you were doing it again for another book tomorrow, would you do it any differently?

Atulya Bingham: The only thing I’d do differently is to start investigating the niches my novel would appeal to far earlier on in the writing process. I was too vague in my pre-launch promotion efforts. As I said, I waited until a month or so after the launch before I started.

Debbie Young: Which part of the book promotion process do you like least?

Cover of Atulya's book

Atulya Bingham’s debut novel

Atulya Bingham: I dislike the distribution process. In the UK this may not apply because enough people use Amazon and all major bookshops refuse to sell Indie authors (this is a blessing in disguise, if you ask me). Here in Turkey it’s a different story. Amazon delivery is hampered by tiresome customs issues, while bookshops, even chains, are less regimented. It’s very easy to find outlets to sell hardcopies of the book: bookstores, hotels, restaurants and cafes are all open to distributing. It is also lucrative. Nonetheless, I find the delivery and collection business tedious.

Debbie Young: Can you name one promotional activity that you’d like to try that you haven’t tried yet – or tried but not yet perfected?

Atulya Bingham: I’d like to do more public speaking events as I love performing and drawing people into the world of my novel. Especially, I’d like to perfect the art of storytelling. I did it once and forgot my lines half-way through.

Debbie Young: Is there anything else you’d like to share with readers now? e.g. news of your next book or event.

Atulya Bingham: Only that Ayşe’s Trail won The One Big Book Launch in April this year, took me five years to write, and was inspired by the nature, culture and women of Turkey.

Debbie Young:  Congratulations, Atulya, on that impressive win, and well done on putting so much time and care into your novel – I guess the latter is one reason why you won the award!

For more information about Atulya Bingham, visit her author website here: www.atulyakbingham.com

FOR MORE TOP TIPS FOR SELF-PUBLISHED & INDIE AUTHORS:

Selling My Books: David Ebsworth’s Top Tip for Book Promotion

Every week, for Writers’ Wednesday, a successful self-published author shares a favourite book promotion tip here on Debbie Young’s Off The Shelf Book Promotions blog

I first met historical novelist David Ebsworth via our mutual publisher, SilverWood Books, and soon realised this British indie author, living in England and Spain, is a prolific and gifted author whose enthusiasm for the many periods he studies is infectious. He’s also highly regarded in historical fiction circles, being a finalist in the Historical Novel Society’s first ever awards for indie authors.

I’m delighted to be able to pin him down in one place for a moment to share his top tips for book marketing, as part of his blog tour to promote his latest novel, The Kraals of Ulundi.

Head shot of David Ebsworth

The historical novelist David Ebsworth

Debbie Young: What’s your favourite book promotion tip? It doesn’t need to be the one that sells the most books – it could just be the one you most enjoy.

David Ebsworth: Hi Debbie. That’s a really difficult question because, to be honest, I enjoy almost every aspect of book promotion. In general though. I agree with a comment that Helen Hollick made on your blog a while ago – that you mustn’t promote the book. As Helen says, you can always promote yourself as the person who wrote it but, personally, I prefer to focus on promoting the background, those things that sparked the story. And that lends itself very nicely to author events that are something massively better than the normal signings.

Debbie Young: How do you do it? Please give brief instructions!

David Ebsworth: Plan ahead. First, look for relevant venues. That can be your favourite friendly bookstore, of course. But it might also be a library, a university, a pub/hotel with some link to the story. You’ll need to make a decent pitch to the venue, so a snappy message – a bit like a short press release – that will grab their attention.

Next, your potential audience. If you’ve got a newsletter list, for example, it helps to make a note on your contact details, if possible, of whereabouts people live, so you can target them when the event is going to be in their area.

Use all your social media to advertise the event. Google all the words associated with the event – the town, subject matter, etc – and compile a further list of possible contact details. Think laterally about this.

Prepare your presentation. Maybe some Powerpoint slides – but check that you’ve got access to the necessary equipment (and always be prepared for the technology to let you down!) Relevant props, like a pull-up banner or objects that might be talking points. And work on your script until it’s as polished as the book itself.

Once you know how the presentation will work, you can start to think about a press release. Make this as snappy as the original venue pitch. It’s massively easier to grab the attention of journalists if you’ve got a good story and you’re approaching them by name. A bit of research is usually enough to find this out, so think about phoning the newspaper or radio station.

Make sure that you have some way of verifying how many people are likely to attend. That way you can always “pull the plug” if it looks like being a flop. Finally, make sure to arrange some light refreshments if that’s appropriate and, when the event takes place, try to use the event not only to sell and sign, but also to gather contact details from any “new” folk who might turn up. Lots of thank yous to all involved, naturally.

Debbie Young: Why do you particularly enjoy this activity?

David Ebsworth: It’s the response of the audience really, I think. The buzz. Always great when they go away “surprised” and thoroughly entertained by the two or three untold stories that inspired your book. This is real contact with your readers. And there’s something very reassuring about being able to speak with confidence about those back-stories.

Debbie Young: Which book(s) have you used it for and when?

Cover of The Kraals of Ulundi

David Ebsworth’s latest novel

David Ebsworth: As examples, and apart from bookstores, I gave some presentations about the background to The Jacobites’ Apprentice in the Manchester pub where, in 1745, Bonnie Prince Charlie’s English supporters gathered to plot their rebellion and, as it happens, where one of the main characters had his lodgings.

For The Assassin’s Mark, I’ve spoken at several meetings of the Co-operative Movement since the book, in part, involves a character who was a journalist for the Co-op’s weekly newspaper during the Spanish Civil War. I gave my presentation to several audiences in Spain itself, too.

And the story behind my third book, The Kraals of Ulundi: A Novel of the Zulu War, has been told at a library near the site where one of the main protagonists is buried, with extra invitations extended to local history groups, students, a South African restaurant and the French/South African Honorary Consuls. The presentations about Kraals have gone down wonderfully well since this year also marks 50 years since the release of that iconic move, Zulu, and the book has been widely marketed as “picking up the story of the Zulu War where Michael Caine left off.” So it’s got loads of “things you didn’t know about the film” elements and similar little-known facts. I also always make sure that I find some “local” link to the story.

Debbie Young: If you were doing it for another book tomorrow, would you do it any differently?

David Ebsworth: Yes, I’d start earlier and be even more inventive about locations. As it happens, my next book, The Last Campaign of Marianne Tambour, is set around the Battle of Waterloo, and I’ve already started to think about venues, particularly since next year is the 200th anniversary of this legendary conflict.

Debbie Young: Which part of the book promotion process do you like least?

David Ebsworth: As I said, I like most of the promotional work, but I have to confess that the social media stuff is the thing with which I struggle most. It’s the time that it takes, I think, and the difficulty of working out whether it’s actually achieved anything. But recently I’ve been concentrating much more just on Twitter and Goodreads. A focus on just one or two bits of social media is, I think, better than a scattergun approach.

Debbie Young: Can you name one promotional activity that you’d like to try that you haven’t tried yet – or tried but not yet perfected?

David Ebsworth: I’m in the middle of completely revising my website www.davidebsworth.com,but I want it to be much more interactive. So I’ve started looking at the use of audio-clips for book extracts. Or better video book trailers.

Debbie Young: Is there anything else you’d like to share with readers now? e.g. news of your next book or event.

David Ebsworth: The current “big thing” is a series of Virtual Book Tours for The Kraals of Ulundi. I had a really successful tour for Assassins back in January. But I was surprised how many people thought that I was really in Colorado one day and Bristol the next. It gave me the idea of organising blog tours that were a bit more “realistic” – hence I spent one week in August writing posts for bloggers in South Africa, scheduled and pitched as though I was actually in their locations. Then there’s this present week in the UK. And, finally, next week, a blog tour of the United States and Canada. Naturally, Debbie, I’ll keep you posted, and thanks for giving me this slot.

Debbie: Thank you so much for joining me here today, David, and bon voyage for the rest of your travels, whether virtual or otherwise!

You might also like to read the posts at the other stops on Dave’s tour – you’ll find links to all of them on his website, but here are his previous three stops on the British part of the tour:

If you’d like to support this prolific author’s next project, check out his crowdfunding project for The Last Battle of Marianne Tambour, set around the Battle of Waterloo, for which there will be 300th anniversary celebrations in 2015.

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Reach New Readers By Sharing Stories on Wattpad

Wattpad logoHere’s a quick and easy way to reach out to new readers for your published books – or to get constructive feedback for your work-in-progress. Simply post free samples on Wattpad – the hugely popular social media site for readers.

It will take you only a few minutes to open a free account, set up your profile and add your first sample – and you can keep adding as much and as often as you like. And don’t worry, the copyright remains with you.

As with all social media sites, there’s an element of building up followers and friends – but your work will also be discoverable via keywords, so new readers may find you who you might not reach in any other way.

I’ve been a member of Wattpad for a while but have not used it much to date, but as with any of these sites, you don’t have to use it all the time to make it worthwhile. Conversely, the more time you spend on it, the more useful (or not!) it might turn out to be.

  • Your ultimate goal, if you’re trying to sell books rather than gain feedback for work-in-progress, is that readers who discover you will like your work so much that they’ll go on to buy your book.
  • If you’re simply seeking feedback, then this is a great way of getting beta-reader-style objective responses from strangers.

Low res coverI know some authors who have had hundreds of thousands of “reads” this way, but even a small number will be worthwhile. If you write in a popular genre – thrillers, scifi, fantasy, romance – you’re more likely to get more readers, but that’s the way of the book world…

For more information and a link to see my work on Wattpad, hop over to the post I’ve just written on my author blog. This is a case study demonstrating me using Wattpad to gain extra attention for my new flash fiction collection, Quick Change, using a topical theme: as it’s a very autumnal day where I live today, I’ve added a story to Wattpad called “Autumn Leaves”.

To start using Wattpad now, head over to www.wattpad.com. Good luck and have fun!

OVER TO YOU

Have you used Wattpad? What did you think of it? If you’re on Wattpad already, let me know and I’ll look you up!

Like to join the Off The Shelf mailing list for a free monthly summary of top book promotion tips for authors? Just click here to sign up! 

Selling My Books: Paul Connolly’s Top Tip for Book Promotion

Every Writers’ Wednesday, a successful self-published author shares a favourite book promotion tip here on Debbie Young’s Off The Shelf blog

Headshot of Paul Connolly

Novelist Paul Connolly. author of “The Fifth Voice”

I first met novelist Paul Connolly over dinner after a SilverWood Books Open Day and was very interested to learn about his debut novel as is publication date approached. Listening to Paul, I could tell he is a natural storyteller, and I’ve downloaded The Fifth Voice to read on my Kindle on holiday this summer. In the meantime, I’m delighted to welcome Paul here today to share his favourite way of promoting his new book. 

Debbie Young: What’s your favourite book promotion tip? It doesn’t need to be the one that sells the most books – it could just be the one you most enjoy.

Paul Connolly: Seek out opportunities to talk about your book, and target relevant special interest groups. Contact groups to whom your subject matter should be of interest. In my case, The Fifth Voice is set in the world of a cappella choral and quartet singing, and there are lots of relevant associations and groups you can say hello to and even write articles for.

Also, keep adding to your email list and reaching out to new people, as well as contacting book groups and independent bookshops. I don’t believe that social media has all the answers, and I think that Facebook and Twitter are wildly overrated in terms of their ability to deliver results for the average author. So much of it seems like whistling in the wind to me. I prefer the personal approach.

Debbie Young: How do you do it? Please give brief instructions!

Paul Connolly: Wherever I go I’m armed with my book’s ‘elevator pitch’ in my head and a few calling cards in my back pocket (a tip here: create double-sided business cards, where one side is the front cover of your book, for maximum impact). Then, a couple of times a week I reach out via email or telephone to specific targets, be it named individuals, singing associations around the world, or indie bookshops.

Debbie Young: Why do you particularly enjoy this activity?

Cover of The Fifth Voice

Such a stunning cover

Paul Connolly: Once you get over the hurdle of thinking nobody will be interested in listening to yet another self-promoting author, you realise that there are people out there who are fascinated by your story, your journey as a writer, and are willing to give you their attention. The enjoyment comes from making connections person-by-person, group-by-group, hopefully building your readership steadily as you go.

You yourself (Debbie) said that marketing an indie book is a marathon not a sprint, and that’s a key lesson to take on board. You’re not shackled by the unrealistic and time-limited expectations of a royalty-hungry publisher who’ll drop you like a stone as soon as your title starts selling less than they would like. Just keep plugging away. With your e-book just a click away, and your paperback always available on demand, there’s no big hurry. Enjoy the ride, but keep working at it (no-one else will!)

Debbie Young: Which book(s) have you used it for and when?

Paul Connolly: The Fifth Voice is my first novel, so I can’t claim masses of experience! One thing I would say is that if you can afford to hire a publicist, even for a short time, it helps to build awareness early on, and I have had some success with local press and radio as a result. This then gives you some ‘marketing collateral’ that you can use when approaching bookshops, etc.

Debbie Young: If you were doing it again for another book tomorrow, would you do it any differently?

Paul Connolly in a suit

Paul Connolly getting into the zone for the National Barbership finals in Harrogate

Paul Connolly: As The Fifth Voice is my first novel, I’m finding out what works and what doesn’t as I go. I would definitely approach things in a similar way, but maybe with a few more tricks up my sleeve. While I don’t think you should rely on social media for your marketing, I’d be keen to squeeze as much juice out of those channels as possible in future. And I’d like to get my head around e-book promotional campaigns and adopt ‘industry best practice’ to maximise sales (if such exists).

Debbie Young: Which part of the book promotion process do you like least?

Paul Connolly: Despite being comfortable appearing in public (I’m a singer, and have done many a business presentation in my time), the thought of sitting in a room signing copies of my book like some wannabe literary star makes me cringe slightly. Also, I feel that the traditional book launch is overrated and is often done because it’s seen as the thing to do rather than because it has major marketing impact.

Debbie Young: Can you name one promotional activity that you’d like to try that you haven’t tried yet – or tried but not yet perfected?

Paul Connolly: I’d really like to speak at a literary event of some sort, where I can talk about the book, the writing process, and share what (little) I know. That may sound like a contradiction to the previous answer, but it’s not really. I don’t mind talking about my book if it means that the book is the centre of attention; I’m far less comfortable with the cult of the author!

Debbie Young: Is there anything else you’d like to share with readers now? e.g. news of your next book or event.

Paul Connolly: When this blog article appears, I’ll be on my way back from a 10-day holiday on my favourite little island. If all has gone to plan, I’ll have the synopsis for my next novel, a sequel to The Fifth Voice, well and truly mapped out. I already know the arc of the story, and the working title, and it’s great to be planning an answer to a question I’ve been asked many times since The Fifth Voice was published: when’s the next one?

Debbie Young: Enjoy your holiday, Paul, and best of luck with book two!

For more information about Paul Connolly, visit his author website here: www.paulconnollyauthor.com

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